7 Plants that Improve the Air Quality of Your Home

 

Dark gray smoke clouds emitted from tall buildings, surrounded by a never-ending stream of cars and trucks.

That’s the image that the average person will be cyclical about when asked to describe air pollution.

Although this air pollution picture is true and threatening, many people do not realize that it does not accurately describe the worst air quality you may experience every day.

So where is the worst air quality?

Maybe in your own living room.

Right. Your own simple living quarters can be contaminated with stagnant and poorly ventilated air. Trapped without a place to go, this air creates havoc on your home and your health with invisible clouds of toxicity.

In fact, according to the EPA, indoor air pollution levels are generally 2 to 5 times greater than outdoor pollution levels. Unsuspecting perpetrators such as furniture, candles, air fresheners, household cleaners containing chemicals, and even all printers combine to make your home a pollution playground.

The sad news: is there any way to fix it?

Yes! This is Mother Nature to save her.

Apparently, there are several types of plants that can act as natural air filters for your home!

How?

When plants absorb carbon dioxide, they also give us the main solid by taking some other nasty particles out of the air at the same time. Small microbes present in certain plant soils also work to clear the air, according to NASA.

Not to mention the plants also make some nice home decor.

Let’s look at the top seven plants that produce the best natural air filter.

1. Boston Fern
Boston ferns reign supreme when dealing with formaldehyde, a by-product of cleaners and chemical paints, among others.

And it’s also a beautiful killer job in handling benzene and xylene, the pollutants that are in the car’s crawling exhaust inside the house from the attached garage.

The plants are a little high maintenance, but caring for them can certainly be done.

They like moisture and prefer watering on ordinary food. This can be daily, depending on the moisture and moisture levels in your home.

Boston fern grows with high humidity, indirect light, and a good soak a month.

2. Spider Plants
If you are just beginning to test your green thumbs, spider plants are a great place to start. Honestly, you should try to kill this plant.

Spider plants do a great job in combating some of the most common domestic air pollutants such as benzene, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide and xylene, solvents used in the printing, rubber and leather industries.

These plants are also pet friendly and almost easy to grow back because they stay alive. All you need to do is cut one of the “spiders” and put it in a new pot.

Spider plants like cool to warm temperatures, indirect sunlight, and dry soil.

3. Aloe Vera
Aloe vera is one plant that has so many superpowers that practically deserves its own post.

This easy-to-grow relief helps your home say goodbye to formaldehyde and benzene.

It can do more than just clean the air.

Aloe vera can also help heal wounds and burns, soothes skin irritation, reduces constipation, moisturizes hair and scalp, aids digestion, and boosts the immune system. All you have to do is open one of the leaves and utilize the gel inside.

In fact, people have used the magical power of aloe vera for thousands of years. The Egyptians even refer to it as “the plant of immortality.”

This hardworking factory loves the sun and makes perfect pieces of decoration on the coffee table or kitchen window.

4. Peace Lily
Do not be confused with his name. This plant is something that is not peaceful when it comes to eliminating harmful air pollutants.

Peaceful daffodils are able to eliminate the three most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) – formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene, and also do considerable work against the toluene and xylene, compounds found in many household products.

Another relatively low-maintenance plant, peaceful lilies just need a little shade and weekly watering to flourish. Moreover, this plant gives you a friendly warning when it needs watering by sagging its lids.

Realize, however, that leaves can be toxic to pets and children.

5. Chrysanthemum
Want to give your home a splash of color?

Enter the chrysanthemum. Plant

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